Posted by: painreliefcoach | October 24, 2007

Myths About Chronic Pain

Through my own journey with chronic pain, I have been subjected to a lot of misinformation about pain and how to relieve and manage it.  I have found the following Myths, and their factual responses, to cover many of the issues that pain sufferers have to deal with.  I hope you will find them enlightening and consoling in helping you to manage and relieve your chronic pain. ·    Doctors are the experts on assessing pain and pain management.o        Fact: Pain is what the patient says it is. Most doctors do not receive training in pain management.   ·    Suffering from pain makes you a stronger person.o        Fact: Constant pain can cause health problems, such as sleep disturbance, weakened immune system and depression.  ·    People with chronic pain can never enjoy life. o        Fact: Functional status is related to quality of life. People with chronic pain can have a good quality of life.  ·    Your condition is worsening if you are experiencing more pain.o        Fact: Pain can come and go for many reasons, and more pain is not a clear indicator that the condition has worsened; however, you should still seek medical attention.  ·    Your pain is not serious if you can relieve it by over-the-counter medication.o        Fact: Over-the-counter pain medications can lead to ignoring a serious medical condition. Repeated high doses of acetaminophen can lead to liver or kidney damage.   ·    Pain means that a particular part of your body is physically damaged.o        Fact: With chronic pain, no evidence of disease or damage to body tissues linked to the pain may be seen.  ·    Morphine is prescribed when death is near.o        Fact: Morphine is used to relief severe pain and helps the patient relax. It can be prescribed in painful conditions that are not life threatening.   ·    Heavy sedation results from pain medications. o        Fact: Pain medication can cause initial sedation; however, with continuing doses of medication, normal activities will return.  ·    A tolerance to pain medications is always developed.o        Fact: Pain medications, including opioids, do not always lead to a developed tolerance. If an increase in dosage is prescribed, it may be due to the need to continuously control the pain. ·    Pain management can only be given in a hospital.o        Fact: Pain management is actually safer and more effective if given in the home. ·    The pain is “in your head.”o        Fact: Pain is in the mind and body. Even if the source of pain is difficult to find, it does not mean it is not there.    ·    Pain medicine should be saved for when it’s really needed.o        Fact: Untreated pain is at risk for becoming chronic.   ·    A strong pain medication should take away all of your pain.o        Fact: Pain medications may not relieve all of your pain and an increase in dosage or different medication could be suggested.  ·    Pain medications are the only way to treat pain.o        Fact: Alternative techniques such as: relaxation techniques, massage therapy, yoga, and acupuncture can be used. ·    Disease control and pain management cannot be given simultaneously. o        Fact: Doctors can treat disease and control pain at the same time. In some cases, treating pain leads to a faster healing time.  ·    The ability to sense pain as you age decreases.o        Fact: Older adults are less likely to report pain, however the ability to sense pain is the same. Even patients with dementia feel pain.   ·    Someone who does not report pain must not have any pain. o        Fact: Everyone expresses pain differently based on his or her history and behaviors. ·    Depression is inevitable with chronic pain.   o        Fact: Depression is treatable. The combination of anti-depressants and counseling is the most effective.  Sources: http://www.painfoundation.org, http://www.theacpa.org, http://www.mayoclinic.com, http://www.hospicefoundation.org   

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: